Todd Anderson's Change In Society In The Dead Poets Society

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“Tradition, honor, discipline, excellence”(Weir). This is the motto of Welton Academy in Peter Weirs, Dead Poets Society. Setting this as a motto can make it difficult to become your own self. Sometimes it takes a little bit of confidence to grow and this is exactly what Todd Anderson discovered. With the fear of living in the shadow of his brother, Anderson is a little worried. Throughout the movie The Dead Poets Society Anderson changes and insecure person into a strong and courageous character.
Todd’s confidence grows and he changes through his experiences; one experiences being when he reluctantly joins The Dead Poets Society. Todd Anderson is the new kid at Welton school. He is not only new, but he is very shy and doesn’t enjoy stepping out of his comfort zone. One time that his lack of confidence is shown is right after Charlie Dalton, a friend of Anderson’s, decides to restart the dead poets society that was previously started by their teacher. “Keating said that everybody took turns reading. And [he didn’t] want to do that” (Weir). When the idea was brought about
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Faced with the fact that Mr.Keating has been fired Todd decides that should take a stand. As the teacher that changed him tremendously walks to the door and is about to leave, Todd jumps up on his desk and turns to face Mr.Keating. Once standing on the desk Anderson delivers the line “O Capitan! My Capitan!”(Weir). Soon after this action was delivered Todd was followed by some of his classmates. These boys are taught to be a little bit different. The group of friends learned that the friendship created between them and their teacher was a meaningful thing in their life. While on the desk, it could be thought that the boys are remembering all of the things that their teacher taught them. Taught them to think more like a romantic, to read, and to understand. They are taught to most importantly, be

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