The Holocaust: The Most Famous Genocide In History

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Although the holocaust is the most famous genocide in history, it was certainly not the only one. The first recorded genocide was Maori in 1835, although there were many before then with historian finding mass graves, that they believe to be the result of genocide as early as 1200 AD. Some aren’t even known to history as there is no record of their existed until years later when histories find a group of people that were suddenly erased from history, or when they find mass graves. All genocides are different but all have the same end goal/result, the majority; race, religion, class, wants to get rid of those they consider less than themselves. Hitler rose to power after the first world, the German government was weak and the people wanting…show more content…
Nazi’s considered Aryans, those of Nordic heritage, to be the master race. According to the national socialist german workers party, Aryans were more culturally gifted, intellectually superior and physically stronger than those of other cultures and backgrounds. The Nazis supported the movement and science behind eugenics, they contributed to the idea that the world could be improved by a practice known as genetic hygiene, this refers to the killing of those that don’t fit the ideal. In the case of the holocaust, this included Jews, people of color and those with a mental disability or illness. Besides values such as racialism, the Nazi party spoke greatly of Nationalism they wanted to restore Germany to their rightful glory that was wrongly snatched from them after the second world war. Their goal was to achieve a country that was self-sufficient, this included goal such as rebuilding the German army and providing for the German people. While the party had little interest in improving and making international relationships, unless it was to further Germany of…show more content…
One of the earliest is when Bruno goes to ask father about the people on the other side of the fence, during the conversation Bruno 's father state’s “ Those people… well, they 're not people at all Bruno. (Boyne, 2005, page 53). This quote offers an explanation for why the Nazis were able to do what they did, they convinced themselves that the Jews weren’t human, therefore they didn’t deserve human rights or a life. These values are also shown through two events in the chapter a Bottle of Wine. When Lieutenant Kotler reveals that this father left Germany in 1938, this sparks a conversation in which the commandants ask what his father reason was for leaving Germany. Bruno 's father, the commandant then asks if Lieutenant Kotler’s father had disagreements with the government “With government policy. One hears tales of men like this from time to time. Curious fellows, I imagine. Disturbed, some of them. Traitors others. Cowards too.” (Boyne, 2005, page 147). Through this statement, we get an idea of what the government thought of those who disagreed with
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