Trail Of Tears History

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"A Brief History Of The Trail Of Tears" White settlers wanted Native Americans removed from their homeland because they wanted to expand their land and are thirst for gold and resources. The U.S. government supported expansion by using the Treaty of New Echota, known as the Treaty Party signed by about 100 Cherokees to justify the removal. Because of the encroachment of white settlers, Native Americans were forced to leave their homeland. Leading up to the Trail of Tears, the U.S. government possessed with greed for gold and expansion of land, ordered the Indian Removal Act of 1830. This act caused the Native Americans to be forced to leave their homeland. To begin, white settlers wanted to find gold. Their greed for gold lead them to discover gold in the Cherokee lands. The passage states, “White resentment of the…show more content…
government ordered the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Using the Treaty of New Echota in 1835, it justified the removal of the Cherokees. “The treaty, signed by about 100 Cherokees known as the Treaty party, relinquished all lands east of the Mississippi River in exchange for land in Indian Territory and the promise of money, livestock, various provisions, tools and other benefits.” In 1838, the U.S. Army began enforcement of the Removal Act under orders from President Andrew Jackson. An estimated of 4,000 Cherokees died during the Journey from hunger, exposure, and disease. So the treaty signed by about 100 Cherokees determined the lives of about 17,000 other Cherokees to live in Indian Territories, and caused the Cherokees to be forced to leave their homeland. In conclusion, the U.S. government ordered the Indian Removal Act of 1830 because of their greed for gold and expansion of land. The white settlers greed for gold and more land caused the Cherokees to leave their homeland, and resulted in the deaths of about 4,000 thousand Cherokees. So the journey of the Cherokees is widely remembered today as “The Trails of
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