Translated Narrative Analysis

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Generally, what we said above with respect to the original narratives can be at work in the translated narratives too, with a much more emphasis on the target language and cultural system. The point is that if the original narratives, as we discussed above, can be ontological, interpersonal, communicative, social, fictional and ideological acts, so should be the translated narrative texts. And, if there happen some frequent changes in POV and FID, there may appear some changes in the ontological, ideological, and social functions of the text. In fact, the translated narratives are first and foremost, the reproductions, at the very broad sense of the word, of the originals in whatsoever form and content. They, however, have got something more:…show more content…
So the translator’s voice and style, having been measured by their creative linguistic choices as well as their repeated linguistic selection, has a lot to do with their ideology; More techniquely speaking, ideology as “the knowledge, beliefs, and value systems” (Simpson 1993, p. 5) of the individual, and the society in which the writer/translator operates, can be chiefly crystallized through the way a writer has chosen a point of view to represent his story. On the other hand, the way a translator may decide to render such a point of view can be ideological too in that the linguistic choices he makes for his rendering can be based on ‘the knowledge, beliefs, and value systems’. In fact, the ideologically motivated translator’s presence can be linked via discourse, i.e. especial language usage, to narrative style on the one side, and to the socio-cultural issues, on the other. It is meant that the linguistic choices resulting from the conscious element of style, as Munday puts it, “have an ideological import because they derive from and reflect the intent, values, beliefs and socio-cultural background and training of author and translator” (ibid, p. 45). Furthermore, ideology brings about the power relations for both the writer, and the…show more content…
In fact, the translator belongs to a society where he lives in and for which he works. He does not translate for himself; otherwise he would fall out of the communicative box/model. This will be keeping him in the process of communicating with the audience whose participant is a determining factor in translation production. In translation studies, this is generally discussed under the label of ‘sociology of translation’. It includes such topics as the translation market, the role played by the publishing industry and other patrons or agents, the social status and the roles of the translators and their profession, and what Toury (1995, p. 249) has called the translation event: starting with the client’s request for a translation and ending with its reception by other agents on various levels. In fact, the socio-culturally translator’s presence can be linked to both their style, psychologically and their voice, ideologically. Of course, it is not in the scope of this dissertation to take such issues into account, and they need to be studies in future
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