Treaty Of Guadalupe Hidalgo Analysis

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Assignment #1 What are the implications of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo? The most important implication that was found from the treaty were the rights of Mexican-Americans. According to Castillo, “ The treaty rights to maintain their language and culture have been denied to Chicanos”. (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 29) The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo promised Mexicans at first the freedom to live out their culture as they were in Mexico, but then took away most of their rights. Their options were either live as a United States citizen, or to go back to Mexico. (Stavans, 37) This brought problems to Mexicans because now they were forced by the U.S government to drop what they know, and to learn how to become a U.S citizen.…show more content…
“Aztlán is the Aztec name for their homeland, was a spiritual and biological nation that included Indians as well as Chicanos” (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 28). The major feature of the Azlán was to argue that Chicanos in the United States are Indians too (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 28). “They were Indians by blood as well as heritage; they suffered the same second class treatment as Indians (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 28). The term Chicano was a used as a derogatory word to working class Mexican immigrants (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 23). However, Mexican Americans redefined the term to get their rights back from the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The major feature of the Chicanism was to “get the worlds attention on the failed promises of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo” (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 23). They started the Chicano Movement to showcase “the struggle for social justice” (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres,…show more content…
One of the first activists to focus on the treaty was Reies López Tijerina. Tijerina traveled throughout New Mexico, organizing La Alianza Federal de Mercedes Libres. He organized this organization to “acquaint the heirs of all Spanish land-grants covered by the treaty with their rights” (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 23). Congress killed off Reies López Tijerina major political accomplishments, but the land-grant situation increased public awareness in New Mexico (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 25). Rudolfo Gonzales, leader an organizer of the Denver Crusade for Justice. Gonzales and Tijerina teamed up with other leaders to issue We Demand, a listing of Mexican Americans needs throughout the nation (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 25). Gonzales major geographical area of operation was in Denver, Colorado. Other major leader during this time is Armando Rendón. Rendón wrote Chicano Manifesto, which talks about how the U.S government violated the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. He states that the treaty is an important document for Mexican American (Bixler-Márquez, Ortega, & Solórzano Torres, 25). David Sánchez played a role in the Chicano Movement. He founded the Brown Beret; which claims that Santa Catalina Island was never in the treaty and is still part of Mexico.
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