True Love In William Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

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Love is such an extraordinary and unpredictable aspect of human life. In William Shakespeare 's “Romeo and Juliet,” two characters of youth, who happen be born and raised in enemy families, fall in love with each other. This supposed love leads to a horrible fate for the young Romeo and Juliet and many others.They fall in a great struggle to share their lives together while the world around the begins to fall apart. But is this love even worth it? Is it even sincere? Undoubtedly not. The love between Romeo and Juliet definitely does not happen to be true love, proven by the facts that the two are as good as strangers toward each other throughout the story and are far too inexperienced and newly bloomed into this world to make the decision…show more content…
Friar Lawrence gains awareness of this as he says this to Romeo the moment he informs Friar about this new Juliet: “Holy Saint Francis, what a change is here! Is Rosaline, that thou didst love so dear, so soon forsaken? Young men’s love the lies not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes” (2.3.69-72). As can be seen, Friar realizes how Romeo had had such a rapid change. His beloved Rosaline, which he could not make absent in his mind, has suddenly vanished from existence the moment Romeo gets a glimpse of the pretty face of Juliet. Romeo forgets about Rosaline when he sees Juliet, as he states “Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight, for I ne’er saw true beauty till this night”(1.5.59.60). Romeo notices how his love for Rosaline was not true, yet he still chooses to “love” someone new immediately, although this is just the same as his previous “love.” His judgement of the love he feels is based merely on beauty, although this is physical attraction, which heh does not understand. Romeo and Juliet are young and have not…show more content…
This can be shown by how Romeo was committed to marrying Juliet by saying, “I will not fail. ‘Tis twenty year till then. I have forgot why I did call thee back” (2.2.183-184). This quote from Romeo supposedly shows how he is determined to be with Juliet. He is excited and cannot wait to be with her, as he states how it will be twenty years of waiting; this is told as a metaphor. But this claim is nonsense, for when Romeo attends Friar Lawrence’s cell to explain to him about this, Friar is outraged and states, “Thou and these woes were all for Rosaline. ANd art thou changed?” (2.3.82-83). Friar, who had experienced Romeo’s woes and sorrow for weekes, who had struggled to maintain his sanity because of this, but now he is in his former superior state because Juliet is now put in the picture. What makes Juliet more favorable to Romeo is that she likes him back, unlike Rosaline. Juliet is same in Romeo’s eyes as Rosaline was, although in Romeo’s case with Juliet, the feelings of attraction are mutual, being the only existent difference between the two
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