Tunnel Vision In The Criminal Justice System

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According to Findley & Scott (2006), tunnel vision is the product of innate cognitive biases, institutional pressures, and normative features of the criminal justice system. As an outcome, there are high numbers of wrongful convictions highly related to organizations and institutional pressures and demands. For instance in the case of Brenton Butler, On May 7, 2000, in the parking lot of a Ramada Inn in Jacksonville, Florida, 65-year-old Mary Ann Stephens is shot in the head before her husband's eyes. Brenton a 15-year-old boys is arrested for matching the profile of the man who committed the murder. In a simplified line up, the victim’s husband identified Brenton Butler as the killer who fled the crime scene. At this point in the case, it becomes clear how there is a great deal pressure by law enforcement and investigative staff to provide evidence to the jury and acquit Brenton of the charges presented against him. Many contextual factors played a role in the wrongful accusation of Brenton Bulter these include: the investigation process, the format of questioning, the evidence…show more content…
If proper steps are not taken an individual can be wrongfully convicted due to cognitive biases, institutional pressures, and normative features of the criminal justice system. For this reason, it is extremely important to take many factors into account when analyzing a case from the moment the individual went in for questioning till the moment the case is closed. Rightful steps must be made so that the presenting cognitive and physical biases do not cloud the judgment of the prosecutors or judges. For this reason, it is imperative that the criminal justice system has a comprehensive understanding of how tunnel vision can affect the system as a whole regarding criminal case

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