Tupac Shakur's Song Analysis

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Victor-Marie Hugo, a French playwright and poet, once stated, “Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent”. Music relives the past, acknowledges the present, and provides wonders about the future. It speaks on any event or situation during any period of time. Music can express the joy and beauty of an era, or it can shine a light on the struggles in reality. For example, in the 1990s, violence, abuse, and injustice plagued low socioeconomic communities. With crime, war, and poverty at an all-time high, a message of hope and strength needed to be delivered. Tupac Shakur, a California rapper with a dream of peace for struggling people, collaborated with rhythm and blues singer, Dave Hollister, and…show more content…
Shakur’s choice of sample fit perfectly with his song due to both works sharing the same central theme. The 1980s single has a more romantic meaning and features a slower beat than Shakur’s song. In the first verse of “Be Alright”, Zapp croons, “We can be together through love and shelter, our very last dime or last meal or last sip of wine”. Zapp enforces the belief that together they can overcome any adversity. The repetition of the word “last” embodies his message of being together until the very end of time. Zapp then sings, “Alright, it’s gonna be alright” as the vocal hook of the song. The rhythm and blues single lacked extensive lyrics but maintained substantial substance to enforce unity and love within people. Similar to “Keep Ya Head Up”, “Be Alright” encourages hopefulness and a sense of security and optimism among those who suffer…show more content…
He recites, “Daddy’s long gone and he left you by ya lonesome, thank the Lord for my kids, even if nobody else want em”. Although the absence of a male figure hinders development within youth, Shakur recognizes the life of youth as a blessing on its own because they lead the world’s future. He raps, “Cause I think we can make it, in fact, I’m sure, and if you fall, stand tall and comeback for more cause ain’t nothin’ worse than when your son wants to kno’ why his daddy don’t love him no mo’”. “Keep Ya Head Up” encourages young men to rise above the absence of their father even though the lack of love threatens to break them down. Shakur raps, “Dying inside, but outside you’re looking fearless, while tears, is rollin’ down your cheeks, ya steady hopin’ things don’t fall down this week”. The song displays how young men are forced to develop a hardened lifestyle that suppresses their true emotions due to the standard belief of a man’s strength. Although their struggle is endless and grows heavier, they can only hope that the worst can be prolonged until they are able to adequately resolve the issue. Shakur recites, “And now my son’s gettin’ older and older and cold from havin’ the world on his shoulders”. “Keep Ya Head Up” shows how young men are drained and transformed into toughened men with endless misfortune surrounding their existence. The use of the metaphor “world on his shoulders”,
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