Tuskegee Conspiracy Theory

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Additionally, trade and foreign direct investment is affected by the prevalence of diseases, which in turn affects the distribution of state resources and spending which contribute to poverty. Par example, the Ebola epidemic which resulted in the withdrawal of the foreign investors, London Mining, in Sierra Leone. The International Monetary Fund, has emphasized the importance of the iron ore sector to Sierra Leone due to a predicted growth output fall from 20% in 2013 to 5.5%. Health risks due to prevalence of disease also restrict mobility between borders with regard to trade. Countries such as Senegal imposed restrictions on the movement of people and goods, which was described as an, “economic blockade,” by the President of Sierra Leone.…show more content…
The Tuskegee Syphillis Study, the Nazi scientific experiments on Prisoners of War during the Second World War are all extreme cases that exaggerate the need for an ethical approach with regard to health. The argument behind conspiracy theories is that diseases may be man made for purpose of experimentation or scientism for the acquisition of knowledge. Other than the immoral and unethical implications as highlighted by these studies, the need for absolute permeability to access treatment is highlighted This is particularly salient in the Tuskegee Syphillis Study in which the sample was not treated for the disease. Although the issues have been debated and opaque nature of seeking treatment has been debunked, there still exists several several factors which prevents persons from seeking treatment which may be rooted in fear of stigmatization, prejudice and/ or discrimination. This is especially the case with sexually transmitted diseases and sexually transmitted infection, where cultures portray sex as taboo. Jamaica, for example is considered a highly homophobic society, which resulted in the detriment of the the death in one third of patients due to failure in seeking treatment for their disease (Beharry et al, 2012). Prevention, whether direct or indirect, to treatment is particularly damaging and therefore acts as a barrier to better health
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