Two Kinds Of Leadership In George Orwell's Animal Farm

731 Words3 Pages
Which kind of leader should govern? A kind and creative one? Or a tyrant? In George Orwell’s Animal Farm, two kinds of leader exists, the smart Snowball and the insidious Napoleon. Although both brought benefits to the farm, the animals lived happier at first. The farm had filled with positive energy, everyone encouraged each other. Greatly different from Snowball’s compassion, Napoleon’s heart was only filled with power and his own selfish desire. Even if the farm became richer, everyone would like freedom instead of living in fear of Napoleon. For the sake of the animal’s livelihood, Snowball should take the place of Napoleon and stay in the Animal Farm to govern the animals. First, Snowball should take the place of Napoleon for he appears more creative than Napoleon. He came up with many ideas that helped the farm. For example, he proposed to build a windmill. That gave…show more content…
Not like Napoleon thinking of profits every day, Snowball cares about the animals’ life. For example, the animals had lots of breaks and ration at first. All the products belonged to themselves, and they did not have to care for food. Everyone received food and worked according to their capacity, and no one grumbled. In the contrast, after the farm had only one ruler, Napoleon, the animals had little ration and have to give out the products. “Napoleon announced that he had decided upon a new policy. From now onwards Animal Farm would engage in trade with the neighboring farms: not, of course, for any commercial purpose, but simply in order to obtain certain materials. The needs of the windmill must override everything else, he said.” Each week, the hens had to hand in their eggs for the farm to trade things with other farms, and the cow had to turn in the milk for the dogs and pigs to drink (Ch.6). Up to these reasons, Snowball should take the place of Napoleon for he considers about others’
Open Document