Uncle Tom's Cabin Essay

1102 Words5 Pages
Many people, even to this day, believe slavery was not as horrendous as it truly was. Harriet Beecher Stowe, however, was able to write a captivating novel that transformed people’s views on such a misunderstood and controversial topic, especially during the time period when America was divided. In the novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” Harriet Beecher Stowe’s overall purpose was to change people’s attitudes and views on slavery by writing relatable and honest characters and their everyday lives so, whether the reader was from the north or south, they could still understand and sympathize with slaves to hopefully open their eyes on the monstrosity of slavery. Stowe was able to write diverse characters that showed her audience that while there are bad…show more content…
Almost all the slaves lost their loved ones, and many others were given to abusive masters. This is especially seen when George opens up about how he wishes his life were different and he had never met Tom and Eliza, because it would be less painful than losing them completely. Other characters that were separated from their families are Topsy and Cassy. Both of these characters have done terrible things as a result, such as Cassy and her child and Topsy acting out. Along with being emotionally hurt, slaves were also beaten and mistreated, like at Legree’s. Despite Uncle Tom being the most well behaved and trusting slave, he was still beaten merely because he stood up for his beliefs. This shows how much of an impact slavery had on blacks, and how it affected them for the rest of their life. Lastly, Stowe wrote her book in order for people to understand that we are all human beings, and therefore we should be treated as one. A reader who is white and owns slaves can still relate to her characters in the book. She writes in a way that makes her audience want to think about what they would do in these situations. This has the ability to open people’s minds and hopefully change how they think. By reading in a new point of view, Stowe’s book optimistically changed people 's perspective on
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