The God Of Small Things Swami Vivekanand Analysis

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It is the social system of the Hindus which has allotted menial jobs – such as cleaning the dirt – to the lower castes. Again, it is the social system of the Hindus which treats these lower castes as untouchables. And this inhuman social practice has been supported, sustained, and perpetuated by religion. It is a matter of great concern and surprise that in Indian literature, prominent poets like Tulsidas and Kabirdas of Bhakti Movement have written very derogatory verses about women and shudras. It is during the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries that under the impact of Western thought of Humanism that highly cultured men like Raja Ram Mohan Roy (Brahmo Samaj), Swami Dayanand Saraswati (Arya Samaj), Swami Vivekanand (Rama Krishna Mission),…show more content…
But he had great urge to learn different trades and crafts. He was an Untouchable of progressive bent of mind. It appeared as if he was determined to prove that an Untouchable was also competent enough to do the jobs which Touchables did. It was just at the age of eleven that Velutha exhibited keen interest like a craftsman in making “intricate toys – tiny windmills, rattles, minute jewel boxes out of dried palm reeds; he could carve perfect boats out of tapioca stems and figurines on cashew nuts.” (Roy 74) Velutha was so fond of learning different trades that at the age of fourteen: Every afternoon, after school, Velutha caught a bus to Kottayam where he worked with Klein till dusk. By the time he was sixteen; Velutha had finished high school and was an accomplished carpenter. He built Mammachi a Bauhaus dining table with twelve dining chairs in rosewood and a traditional Bavarian chaise lounge in lighter jack. (Roy…show more content…
She makes a scathing attack on the patriarchal norms of Kerala’s Touchable society; high caste Hindus and high caste Syrian Christians. Pappachi – the oldest character in the novel – is a “male chauvinist.” (Dasan 32) He is challenged by his own daughter Ammu: “Ammu challenges the defiled social order and what it represents by marrying a man of her choice” (Pillai 90) and thus celebrates her disapproval of male dominated custom of arranged marriage whereby marriage can’t be solemnized without the final approving nod of the parents. She met her would be husband at a wedding reception in Calcutta. Her would be husband “proposed to Ammu five days after they first met. She just weighed the odds and accepted. She thought that anything, anyone at all would be better than returning to Ayemenem. She wrote to her parents informing them of her decision. They did not reply.” (Roy 39) In fact for Ammu Ayemenem was a dark and a dismal symbol of male domination, male tyranny, male indifference and male hegemony. She got rid of the hell-like Ayemenem where she felt suffocated; and now after marriage she felt a sigh of relief and started breathing fresh air under the sky of her own. She was in a way celebrating her emancipation from centuries old male domination when “she smoked long cigarettes in a silver cigarette holder and learned to blow perfect smoke rings.” (Roy 40)
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