Upon The Burning Of Our House Essay

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Do you believe God would take away everything to prove a point? Well Puritans did and they were straying away from their belief; therefore, two people in particular tried to save their people from sin. How can someone scare other people to do the right thing and get closer to God? In two of my sources, “Upon the Burning of Our House” by Bradstreet and “Sinner In the Hands of an Angry God” by Edwards, they conveyed two different types of scare tactics. The Puritans believe in their religion very strongly. However there are always some question to God’s judgement on why he does certain things. Meanwhile, Edwards is depicting to the Puritans that God does not like to be question on things that he does to us. “In the house of God, it is nothing…show more content…
Puritans thought that eternal life was guaranteed when they reunited with God. Bradstreet said, “My hope and treasure lies above”(54). She put all her faith into the house more than Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ wants the Puritans trust in him and not into material object. Edwards made it quite clear that God has no room for error. Puritans could not make a mistake if they wanted to receive everlasting life. Puritan strived to have a great relationship with God , often though they stray away. Edwards came to direct with back to the right path with God by scaring them saying they would be condemned to Hell. Bradstreet on the other hand, took a different approach like a father taking away his little children toys. They are both well incentives to do the right thing. However, nobody truly knows how they are seen in God’s eyes until Judgment Day. No one is perfect. The Puritans even knew that; however, God gives a second chance at a new beginning, so that they would not die in sin. Bradstreet and Edwards were only trying to draw their people closer in their faith. Both of their ways were effective because they hit places that meant the most to them. However, the question still stands are you right in the eyes of the
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