Urie Bronfenbrenner's Theory

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Dyslexia is a learning disability that causes severely affects a person’s ability to read. It affects about 5% of the population (Zorzi et al), meaning that it is more than likely that a teacher will encounter a child with dyslexia multiple times within their career. Dyslexia does not affect a person’s mental capability; people who suffer from this disability are just as intelligent as everyone else, their brains just do not process letters and numbers in the same way that everyone else does. However, dealing with dyslexia during middle childhood could cause a problem for reading development. As a teacher, this can cause issues in any classroom setting, no matter the subject. If a student has a hard time reading, they will easily fall behind…show more content…
Under Bronfenbrenner 's theory, the biggest correlation for a child 's development is their environment.Bronfenbrenner would then blame the developmental challenge of dyslexia on the environment and question “Where did we go wrong?” rather than recognizing it as a learning disability that comes at no fault of others. Bronfenbrenner would credit a change in parenting, a change in school or a detachment to their parents as the cause for the dyslexia. A way to help a child with dyslexia under Bronfenbrenner 's theory, would be for the teachers and parents of the student to come together to help them work through…show more content…
From these findings, there are many implications about how to help dyslexic students succeed. Children with dyslexia are just as intelligent and capable as other students, they see letters and numbers differently from other children. Although it was not explicitly stated, both articles implied that dyslexic children have the capability to do anything that a student with no learning disability can do. Neither of the articles assumed that dyslexic children are content to be behind their peers, or that it was acceptable as educators to let them fall behind. Instead, they looked for solutions to the problem. Another implication made was that many children get frustrated with their disability, and give up. Despite being just as intelligent as their peers, students with dyslexia may fall behind because they simply cannot keep up with fast-paced reading. To help with this, educators needs to recognize their frustrations and help them get
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