Us Foreign Policy In The Late 1800s Essay

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During the late 1800s, the U.S. stance on foreign policy changed dramatically from an isolationist viewpoint to an involved world power. This was influenced by many factors, including the desires to spread cultural values or religion, 'help' countries that were deemed 'not fit to rule themselves', keep up with other major world powers, and trade globally to forward the economy. Presidents McKinley, Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson held terms instrumental in the development of foreign policy. During George Washington's term as president, foreign policy was a new concern, as the U.S. had just gained independence from Britain and was focused on remaining independent, so for many years, the U.S. kept an isolationist viewpoint regarding foreign …show more content…

McKinley was very important in foreign policy, being the president who started the Spanish-American War. McKinley hoped to peacefully persuade Spain to grant independence to Cuba, but when that negotiation failed, he began the War in 1898, stating in his State of the Union Adress that "The reasons to go to war are these: First, in cause of humanity… …Second, we owe it to our citizens in Cuba… …serious injury to the trade and business of our people… …when the lives and liberty of our citizens are in constant danger…" Which includes many reasons for foreign involvement, including economic, humanitarian, and national defense. In the war, the U.S. gained victory, and through the treaty of Paris, Spain ceded Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Phillippines to the United States as well as promising independence to Cuba, which remained under U.S. control. Mckinley then led the U.S. in the annexation of the territory of Hawaii. Roosevelt was very aggressive in building the Panama canal, and Intervened in Latin American internal affairs to try to make it happen. He also extended the Monroe Doctrine with the …show more content…

This was the first major hostile interaction the U.S had began with Europe since the American Revolution, and was the start of a new era of foreign policy. The U.S. also had many reasons for getting involved, including the interests of national security and economy and the interests of Cuba. The war began the U.S. push to become a global power, and the treaty of Paris, through the new gains of the U.S. in the Pacific, brought forth imperialistic ideology and started the major push for imperialism that drove U.S. policy for many years. Many wanted imperialism so that the U.S. could keep up with the rest of the world, and because of foreign policy objectives, of which many favored economic, ethnocentric, and ideologically based decisions. The war and the treaty started the U.S. on the path to being seen as a major world power and an expanding global

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