Utopia And Dystopian Society In George Orwell's '1984'

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In many novels such as 1984 by George Orwell, they use the ideas of an almost perfect or a non-perfect world or society. Orwell portrays two types of utopias in his novel, 1984 but they can be seen as both depending on what aspect the reader is looking at. A utopian society is an imagined place or state in which everything appears perfect to a certain point. A dystopian society is a conceived place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degrading society. Orwell uses Winston Smith to project the utopian society he has made by showing how it affects the people. Both forms of life in the novel are shown progressively throughout the novel. In the novel 1984, George Orwell uses a dystopian society to show the progression of Winston Smith’s character and help create structure for his plot. Winston’s character is affected throughout the creation and expansion of the plot from both the utopian and dystopian society. In 1984, Oceania is supposed to be a perfect utopian in the mindset of the Party. But Winston disagrees, this is the main contributor to the use of a dystopian society in the novel. In the beginning of the novel Winston starts to write in his diary which he bought from…show more content…
Orwell created a novel that shows the ideas and themes of his utopian and dystopian society. The plot is supposed to show how great it is to live in Oceania, but in retrospect we are shown something different through the eyes of Winston Smith. There are multiple signs of the chaos that is and or leading to the involvement of the Party and Big Brother. The ideas of both of the topias lead us through the progression of the novel and the progression of Winston's character as well. In the novel 1984, George Orwell uses a dystopian society to show the progression of Winston Smith’s character and help create structure for his
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