V-Twin Engine History

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INTRODUCTION
A V-twin engine, also called a V2 engine, is a two-cylinder internal combustion engine where the cylinders are arranged in a V configuration.Gottlieb Daimler built a V-twin engine in 1889. It was used as a stationary power plant and to power boats. It was also used in Daimler's second automobile. In November 1902, a V-twin engine motorcycle, and in 1903 V-Twins were produced by other companies. Also, in 1903, Glenn Curtiss in the United States, and NSU in Germany began building V-twin engines for use in their respective motorcycles. Peugeot, which had used Panhard-built Daimler V-twins in its first cars, made its own V-twin engines in the early 20th century.

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Crankshaft Configurations
Most V-twin engines have a single crankpin,
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Combustion gas moves into the LP cylinder through the transfer manifold. Exhaust stroke continues at the HP cylinder.

9. Exhaust Stroke ends at the HP Cylinder.
When the angle is at 3600 and the exhaust stroke ends at the HP cylinder. The combustion gas ends moving into the LP cylinder through the transfer manifold. The exhaust cycle continues at the LP cylinder which is at the angle of 2700.

10. Admission Cycle starts at the HP Cylinder.
As the exhaust continues at the LP cylinder, the mixture from the carburetor of air and fuel moves into the HP cylinder and the admission stroke starts at the HP cylinder. The angle at the HP cylinder is 00 now.

11. Exhaust Cycle ends at the LP Cylinder.
When the exhaust ends at the LP cylinder, the admission strokes continue at the HP cylinder. Now the angle at the HP cylinder becomes 900.

12. EGR Cycle starts at the LP Cylinder.
The EGR gases move into the LP cylinder and admission cycle starts at 00. While the same admission stroke continues at the HP cylinder.

13. Admission Stroke ends at the HP Cylinder.
At 900, the LP cylinder admission continues through the EGR manifold. Simultaneously , at 1800, the admission stroke ends at the HP cylinder.

14. Compression Stroke Starts at the HP

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