Victims Of Fate In Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

671 Words3 Pages
William Shakespeare once wrote, “It is not in the stars to hold people’s destiny but in themselves.” Despite the depth of an ancient family feud, Romeo and Juliet pursued their love together, considered by some to be infatuated, even when given many obstacles to overcome. Rather than live without one another, the two teens took their lives to put the everlasting feud to a halt. Romeo and Juliet are victims of destiny, star-crossed lovers whose death’s are inevitable of doom due to their lack of approval from society, passion of love, and unfortunate luck. The two lovers are victims of destiny because of their lack of approval from society, especially from their family. In Romeo and Juliet, the Montague family and the Capulet family hold a strong grudge toward one another, just a glance in one’s direction causes great exasperation. Juliet speaks to Romeo, “The orchard walls are high and hard to climb, And the place death, considering who thou art, If any of my kinsmen find the here” (II, ii, 63-65).…show more content…
Throughout the course of Romeo and Juliet, the two individuals fall hard for each other, inevitably resulting in their deaths, allowing them to be together. Romeo speaks aloud, “Will I set up my everlasting rest, And shakes the yoke of inauspicious stars… A dateless bargain to engrossing death” (V, iii, 119-124). It can be inferred from the previous evidence that Romeo will do anything to defy fate and destiny, a power often vested in the movement of stars, to be with Juliet. Death has become an act of love for Romeo. Their passion of love has been put under classification as infatuated by several readers. In spite of the claim, William Shakespeare clears up the surface during the play. Juliet goes on to ask Romeo if he is in love with her, or in love with the idea of love, and Romeo proves himself by showing his passion of love in many ways such as a
Open Document