Victor Frankenstein And The Creature In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Frankenstein is a world renown novel that deals with Romantic and gothic themes. The two main characters are Victor Frankenstein, the scientist, and the Creature, who is also known as “The Monster.” This creature is assembled from old body parts and strange chemicals, animated by a mysterious spark. He enters the world eight feet tall but with the mind of a newborn. Abandoned by his creator and confused, he tries to integrate into society, only to be shunned universally. Some would feel contrite for the monster, whose face not even a mother/mad scientist could love. It is through rejection and loneliness that the Creature develops his personality. Even though he may be a “Monster” in our eyes, one should examine how quickly the Creature…show more content…
He describes him having “Yellow skin [that] scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast….” (35) One would say that this description is “Monstrous.” Victor cannot be exactly blamed for dashing out the door, but it is important to note that he has already exposed himself to put emphasis on appearance. Unfortunately, Victor is not the only one who was terrified of “The Monster” at first sight. The Creature had been spying on a sweet, gentle family that fell into pieces when they saw him: “Agatha fainted; and Safie, unable to attend to her friend, rushed out of the cottage. Felix darted forward, and with a supernatural force…dashed me into the ground and struck me violently with a stick.” (96-97) However, establishing the Creature’s ugliness does not prove whether he is a…show more content…
He has visions of “amiable and lovely creatures” keeping him company (93); he admires Agatha and Felix as “superior beings.” (79) He describes himself as having “good dispositions” and tells De Lacey that “My life has been hitherto harmless and in some degree beneficial.” (95) The Creature undergoes “extreme labour” to rescue a young girl from drowning. (101) The poor fellow’s actions are always misinterpreted. Felix and Agatha believe that he is going to attack their father, the public assumes that he is attempting to murder the young girl, and William Frankenstein assumes that the Creature is going to kill him. The moment where the Creature is accused of murdering the girl is the turning point for the monster. “‘This was then the reward of my benevolence! I had saved a human being from destruction, and as a recompense I now writhed under the miserable pain of a wound which shattered the flesh and bone. The feelings of kindness and gentleness which I had entertained but a few moments before gave place to hellish rage and gnashing of teeth. Inflamed by pain, I vowed eternal hatred and vengeance to all mankind.”
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