Violation Of The Supreme Court Case Of John Marshall

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The Constitution states in Article III, Section 1 that "the judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish (uscourts.gov)." Lawsuits among two or more states and cases relating to ambassadors and diplomats are examples of cases where the Supreme Court has original jurisdiction. The Court also has appellate jurisdiction on virtually any other case that involves violations of constitutional or federal law. Finally, the Supreme Court has the final interpretation of law on all matters concerning the U.S. Constitution, federal laws, and treaties. Consequently, all decisions from Supreme Court have a profound impact on society; even …show more content…

Although he found that the petitioners were in fact entitled to their commissions, he believed that the Constitution did not give the Supreme Court the power needed to issue writs of mandamus. Marshall ruled that Marbury had been appropriately appointed in accordance with the procedures established by law and thereby had a right to a writ of mandamus. The Chief Justice concluded that Section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789 was unconstitutional as Section 13 of the act was inconsistent with the Constitution and consequently unacceptable. Original jurisdiction was the only jurisdictional issue oversaw by the Constitution. Article III of the Constitution applied only to cases "affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls" and to litigation "in which the state shall be party (History.com)." By extending the Court's original jurisdiction Congress had surpassed its authority. Arguably the most significant case in Supreme Court history, Marbury v. Madison (1803) was the first Supreme Court case to apply the principle of judicial review. Judicial review refers to the power of federal courts to nullify an act of Congress if they are in conflict with the Constitution. The decision in Marbury v. Madison played a pivotal role in establishing the Supreme Court as a separate yet equal branch of …show more content…

The decision supported the idea that the securities of the federal Bill of Rights are guaranteed against the states, through the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Due to the vagueness of the Fourth Amendment, the range of interpretation for the exclusionary rule has been a topic of courts and since the 1980s. In time courts have narrowed the range of circumstances and types of evidence to which the rule

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