Native Son Violence Analysis

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always through violence. It is here, perhaps, that he is most pessimistic because, as far as Wright’s protagonists are concerned, the other and more positive manifestations of desire, such as love, can come only later, after the protagonists have violently acted out their longings. Violence is central to Wright’s fiction and to his characters; it is as important as sensuality is. In Wright’s world, power is often achieved through violence. Therefore, we can see that in Native Son, beatings and murders are frequent experiences in Bigger’s life. Wright created Bigger in Native Son to show the author’s feelings towards White American society. And for Wright it didn’t really matter whether the White politicians accepted or rejected Bigger. There…show more content…
The first scene of Book One of Native Son starts with Bigger brutally destroying a rat. Bigger and his family are living in a tenement apartment where they are attacked by a wild rat. Naturally, Bigger is uneasy and wanted to kill the rat. Therefore, he took a shovel and by mustering all his strength, he pounded the shovel on to the rat‘s head and killed the rat. In fact, the rat symbolizes his family’s poverty and the killing of the rat foreshadows other murders in the novel which Bigger commits in due course. Also Bigger himself has been caught like a…show more content…
And he is bad, miserable, depressed, oppressed, a bully and a petty thief because of his background which is full of poverty, criminality, wants, violence etc and which influence his character. He wants to help his family by working as a chauffeur, but, unfortunately, the same night he kills his master’s daughter and burns her body into a furnace. It begins to snow and Bigger leaves the Dalton house and returns to his mother’s tenement apartment feeling like a new man. He now thinks that everyone he knows is blind; he is himself filled with elation for having killed a White girl, the ultimate taboo which he has gotten away with in the act of destroying the White girl who, for Bigger, is a symbol of White oppressive culture. To seal his fate, Wright has Bigger murder his girlfriend Bessie in a brutal and premeditated manner in Book Two. As the snowfall becomes a blizzard, Bigger is surrounded by the White world whose search closes in on him and they capture him. Boris A. Max, a Communist party lawyer, who is himself a White, undertakes Bigger’s defence because Bigger has implicated Jan and the party in a kidnap note to the Daltons. Actually, in Native Son Max almost becomes Bigger’s spokesman. In the novel, Max is used as a representative of Communist character in American
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