Violence In Romeo And Juliet

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William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo and Juliet, is surface on the tale of love. Somewhere within the play we see many different connections between violence, hate, and death. Romeo and Juliet’s death are cause by the unbending and strict society that would not allow them to be together. The connection between violence and love is to be determined. The drama is able to advice readers more or less with the meaning of gender, love, and fate, and it will provide examples of how our society is today. Furthermore, our protagonist, Romeo, masculinity is questioned throughout the play. For example: Romeo fears that his love for Juliet softened him, “Thy beauty hath made me effeminate/And in my temper soften’d valour’s steel” (Shakespeare 111.i.). Secondly, Laurence impute guilt against Romeo of being “unseemly woman in a seemly man” and verbalize that his tears are “womanish” (Shakespeare 111.iii.). Another example, is Mercutio, he enjoys fencing, quarreling, and joking. Mercutio defines himself on how masculinity is supposed to look like. He criticized Juliet cousin Tybalt for his fake accent that he speaks and his interest in his clothes. In addition Marcutio is happiest when Romeo rejoins his group…show more content…
According to Jamieson “Shakespeare’s treatment of love in the play is complex and multifaceted. He uses love in its many guises to thread together the key relationships in the play” (Lee 1). First, we see Romeo is in love with Rosaline in the beginning of the play. In today society we might describe it as “Puppy Love.” Laurence did not believe it will last long: Romeo says “Thou chid’st me oft for loving Rosaline” and Laurence replies “For doting, not for loving, pupil mine” (Shakespeare 11.iii.). Likewise, Paris is not in love with Juliet, it was more tradition then Passion. Jamieson mention’s that “He has identified her as a good candidate for a wife and approaches her father to arranges the marriage” (lee
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