Voltaire Rogue Thinker Analysis

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Voltaire: The Rogue Thinker "God is a comedian playing to an audience too afraid to laugh" (New World Encyclopedia), once said the French Enlightenment writer, Voltaire. Ever since he began to become popular in Europe, Voltaire had an intense dedication to his beliefs. This offset the fact that he never created a philosophy of his own. He was a man of ideas rather than systems, and he used his works to criticize them. Attacking religion because of its systems, Voltaire gathered a great deal of attention both good and bad. Due to his controversies, Voltaire was exiled twice from France; yet, he continued to write more about his beliefs and gathered a massive following. Voltaire connected to his audience through many different outlets including…show more content…
The ideas and beliefs that Voltaire supported attracted a wide audience. Although these were unoriginal, they still appealed to people nonetheless. Voltaire was able to write multiple genres such as plays, novels, and so on. The main purpose of his documents was to create action. He wanted to influence people to do something with their beliefs. Voltaire’s philosophy was a mixture of multiple philosophies in which he picked and chose which ideas to keep and which to dispose of. As a result, he created a philosophy of his own, though its ideas are unoriginal. “Voltaire adopted a stance in this text somewhere between the strict determinism of rationalist materialists and the transcendent spiritualism and voluntarism of contemporary Christian natural theologians” (Stanford). Throughout the Enlightenment, Voltaire also spread the ideas of Isaac Newton and John Locke all over the continent. Newton, in particular, became popular because of Voltaire. Before 1734, not many people knew whether Newton’s ideas were true or not. His concepts like the theory of universal gravitation and physics of gravity in empty space began to form questions about his credibility. However, Voltaire cleared these controversies with the Letters on the English Nation. Voltaire believed in science over the reasoning of Socrates resulting in his support for Newton. Being one…show more content…
Even after being exiled two times from his home country, he still continued to encourage reform through multiple genres of writing. He was able to write any genres and express his philosophy. Although unoriginal, his philosophy still appealed to a wide range of people. Voltaire was a criticizer of the church who wrote multiple compositions, one of which was Candide, to attack them. Not only did he attack the Church, he also criticized other philosophers and their works as well. As a man of science, Voltaire looked up to and respected the works of Isaac Newton, writing many documents about his work. His works of the Enlightenment era eventually shaped Western philosophy as we know it today. Voltaire, although insane, was one of the most influential writers of the
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