Voters Role In The Electoral College

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The Presidential elections occur every four years. Which provide candidates’ time to share their political ideals with the general population. Once voting occurs the Electoral College takes its role. To become president it 's required to have 270 electoral votes. But, the process of getting to president is disproportional. For example disproportionate state votes, tie votes, and unbound electors are hindering democracy. The first and foremost issue is voting. Each state is provided one electoral vote for each member of its delegation, However, depending on a state 's population the amount of electoral votes varies. For example, "an individual in Wyoming has more than triple the weight in electoral votes compared to a citizen in California." Providing the conclusion that small states such as New Jersey hold no significance in the elections despite it being part of the United States. Which leaves into question, what matters? "Only 41 of the 50 states matters in the election" Due to the…show more content…
Caused by the flaw in the federal law that electors do not have to vote for whom they have pledged for. However, a punishment is given if they choose to go down that route "($1000 fine)". The issue with this is, when voting, rather than directly voting for the campaigner a voter is actually voting for his/her elector. And in return, the elector will vote for that campaigner. Rendering citizen votes useless in elections if the citizens don 't even get to choose who they wish to be president. Thus hindering our nation 's democracy even more. For even the constitution states "we the people" rather than "we the government". Another issue is "since the birth of the electors college, 157 electors have not casted their votes to the candidate 's they represent".Shockingly enough, this issue has been allowed to be proceeded since the birth of the electoral college. Providing Americans with no true democracy
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