W. E. B. Dubois, Thurgood Marshall, And Malcolm X

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Throughout history there have been many civil rights activists who have inspired and changed the world. These Activist create movements whose purpose is to create a progressive society with equal justice and opportunity for all. There were two movements that were particularly important in the United States during the 1920s and the mid 1950s. In those movements were activists such as W.E.B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Booker T. Washington, Martin Luther King Jr., Thurgood Marshall, and Malcolm X. When looking at each activist and their beliefs it is apparent that there are similarities between the older activist and younger ones. All wanted equality among races, but when discussing how to obtain it their paths had differed. I believe that Marcus …show more content…

In 1946 he was arrested and put in jail for larceny, while he was there he read about islam, and eventually converted. Malcolm X, who was inspired by Marcus Garvey, believes as well that there could be no peace nor equality with white people. However, unlike Garvey, Malcolm X didn't believe they should go to Africa, but that the races could have their own separate states in the US. In the end however, Malcolm X didn't continue to see things the ways he once did and accepted that there was a possibility of working together with everyone. Malcolm X made a lot of progression the the Civil Rights Movement of the mid …show more content…

DuBois, Thurgood Marshall, and Martin Luther King Jr. all of them actively discussing equality sooner rather than later. W.E.B. DuBois was a founder of the Niagara Movement and the Crisis Magazine. He was a member of the American Labor Union who called for equal labor right. Unlike Garvey and Malcolm X he did believe that the races could coexist, but unlike Booker T. Washington he fought for equal rights now instead of later. He believed that despite education, ability, and birth, that all people deserved fair treatment and that they shouldn’t have to wait for it. In the 1950s Thurgood Marshall and Martin Luther King Jr. also share this ideology. Thurgood Marshall was the first African-American Supreme court justice, and a civil rights advocate. He was part of the NAACP and fought many cases against racial segregation. In Brown vs the Board of Education he argues that separate school facilities could not possibly be equal. As a supreme court justice he continue to fight against segregation and the death penalty, and fight for the protection of individual’s rights and abortion. Due to how he progressed the civil rights movement and didn’t believe in waiting for rights is why I believe that he is more similar to DuBois than the other two older

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