Walker's Appeal To Colonize Analysis

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There are other abolitionist elements included in Walker’s appeal, especially in his stance against the popular colonizing plan that would have the entire African American population boarded onto ships and sent to Africa. Walker is vehemently against any such plan, no matter how the idea is pitched since “this country is as much ours as it is the whites, whether they will admit it now or not.” He immediately picks out one of the more obvious fallacies with the colonization plan to hone in on: that the people on that ship will not have been directly from Africa, rather they were born and raised in the United States. Walker is staking a claim and ownership in the country, something that as he mentions, is not a popular, or common, view. This…show more content…
Walker elaborates on the enslaved ownership and connection to the country demanding “do you think to drive us from our country and homes, after having enriched it with our blood and tears.” He wants for whoever reads the pamphlet to acknowledge the labor that slaves are forced into, and see it as an actual human contribution not by something inhuman. Walker questions the motivations of the colonizing plan supporters, claiming that those “for colonizing us, more through apprehension than humanity.” He does not want to give any benefit of the doubt toward the biggest supporters of this plan, rather he points out that they have ulterior motives that have nothing to do with what is the best decision for the actual people. Instead, he wants to demonstrate that those who do support the deportation and colonization of African Americans are doing it out of their own desire to protect themselves, fear of what might happen otherwise, which is all the more reason to ignore the plan or give it any legitimacy. In that same vein he points out that to follow the plan would mean “that we ought not be set free in America, but ought to be sent away to Africa!!!!” To Walker, the slaveholders are so desperate to avoid giving slaves their freedom and granting them their equal rights that it
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