Wallace Stevens Poem Analysis

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Maria Stan Assist. Lect. Dragoș Manea 19th Century American Literature 20th January 2016 PINE-TREES CRUSTED WITH SNOW AND THE EYE OF THE BLACKBIRD – THE OBSESSION OF FRACTALS IN WALLACE STEVENS’ POETRY Poetry is the supreme fiction, Madame, says Stevens in one of his early poems. The importance of imagination and its way of how it can manipulate the world as we know it (both physically and spiritually) has been both a main theme of poetry and a stylistic and structural way of writing since the British Romantics have pointed it, making possible for this spirit to survive and to call the British Romantic poets as a vital (McLane et. al, 264) and a source of energizing force in later twentieth and twenty-first-century poetry (idem). While…show more content…
The definition of Stevens’ poetry can not be reduced at one single self-given sentence about it. The Pennsylvanian poet is building up the frames containing all of its philosophical poems by smaller pieces. The poems are readable inside-out – they start as singular particles which intertwine with each other and create the bigger picture, as if the reader jumps off a cliff: at first one sees the grass, the sea, the sky, but when he has no earth under his feet, rolling fearlessly into the air, he could feel and see every small detail of the…show more content…
(…) III The blackbird whirled in the autumn winds. It was a small part of the pantomime. Stevens uses the blackbird’s symbolism to describe both the nature of the universe, as being composed of multiple landscapes and scenery, and the nature of the human being, which, unlike in The Snow Man do not really intertwine, but remind more of the twentieth century European movies, with images rolled one after another chaotically, than of a unitary piece of art. Just like Ezra Pound’s two-lined poem In a Station of the Metro, each one of Wallace’s short stanzas can be interpreted separately. For example, on the one hand, in the eight part of the poem, - I know noble accents And lucid, inescapable rhythms; But I know, too, That the blackbird is involved In what I know. - the speaker admits that, somewhere in the back of his head, a blackbird is partly responsible for one of the greatest, deepest knowledge that he has. It also dictates the limited, perspective of the viewer, who knows that the world he sees (the edge) it is such a small part of the whole one: When the blackbird flew out of sight, It marked the
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