Warriors Don T Cry: A Political Cartoon Analysis

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Throughout history, minorities were treated very harshly, whether they were immigrants, refugees, or colored people. When it comes to the topic of treatment of minorities evolving, most of us strongly agree that the treatment of minorities has definitely changed over time. Where this agreement usually ends, however, is on the question of immigrants and colored people. While some are convinced that the treatment has drastically changed throughout history, others believe that the treatment is just as harsh as the past. Ultimately, the treatment has shifted to a less harmful way of living compared to what people in the past had gone through. Warriors Don 't Cry is one source that proves that the treatment of minorities has changed throughout…show more content…
This book describes the struggles of black students wanting to integrate schools with white students. It continues to explain how school systems dealt with integration and how it is…show more content…
An additional source that proves the change in minorities treatment is a political cartoon “1963 and 2011”. This political cartoon compares blacks in 1963 to Latinos in 2011. The cartoon shows two students that can 't get an opportunity at an education in Alabama Public Schools. The cartoon shows also how in both years, two different races were being treated unfairly by the same school system. The door on the 1963 side of the cartoon had said “Alabama Public Schools, whites only”(1963-political cartoon). During segregation times between blacks and whites, schools forbid blacks from going to school with the whites. They were required to go to a separate school, just like how they had to ride on separate sections of trains and buses. This has evolved over time because today, students of every race and color go to school together with no more segregation. The second door in the cartoon represents 2011 and says “Alabama Public Schools, No Latinos”(2011-political cartoon). Although this part of the cartoon says that Latinos were not allowed in schools, it was also six years ago. Within those six many schools have accepted Latinos and their right to come to school with public students. Thus, overtime Latinos have gained rights in other states that they could move to for better education instead of Alabama. In conclusion, both black and Latinos had gained many rights since segregation times, but a photograph of Elizabeth Eckford goes into depth on black rights outside Central
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