We Screwed Up Analysis

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Have you ever wondered what our children, and grandchildren’s lives will be like? We Screwed Up; A Letter of Apology to my Granddaughter (Ward, 2012) is a letter written by Chip Ward to his four year old granddaughter and her possible unborn siblings. He speaks clearly about the devastation that past generations have caused to the planet we all call home, although he fails to provide any evidence concerning what he claims, as well as majorly lacks appreciation for the organizations already working towards a better tomorrow. Chip Ward begins his letter with an apology to his granddaughter and her siblings for using up all of the oil. He claims that, “We are all gas-hogs, plain and simple” (Ward, 2012), in regards to his generation and those…show more content…
We Screwed Up; A Letter of Apology to my Granddaughter (Ward, 2012) is a letter written by Chip Ward to his four year old granddaughter and her possible unborn siblings. He speaks clearly about the devastation that past generations have caused to the planet we all call home, although he fails to provide any evidence concerning what he claims, as well as majorly lacks appreciation for the organizations already working towards a better tomorrow. Chip Ward begins his letter with an apology to his granddaughter and her siblings for using up all of the oil. He claims that, “We are all gas-hogs, plain and simple” (Ward, 2012), in regards to his generation and those previous of it. He goes further to state that we created everything we use from oil. From, “baby bottles” to “lawn chairs,” we made everything out of oil and “could never get enough of it” (Ward, 2012). Furthermore, he touches on what he sees to be a false triumph of humankind. Amazing technological discoveries and inventions that were intended with goodness to create a more suitable earth but in reality just ruined our ability to communicate physically and be present in the moment. Pressing on, he apologizes for the climate change. The melting of the glaciers and the disappearances of the species that once graced the earth with their presence. He apologizes for the chemicals, saying somewhat calmly, “I mean the ones you were born within your blood and bones that stay there—even though we don’t know what they’ll do to you” (Ward, 2012), He concludes his letter by placing pity on his grandchildren and perhaps even great grandchildren by saying that he wishes there were more that he could do to help them, but essentially, it’s up to them to create a better future for themselves. This can be easily detected given that he offers no suggestions for improvement or damage
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