Effects Of Disarmament

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Weapons of mass destruction and disarmament form one of the toughest challenges for the world today. One of the most dangerous weapons on the earth are nuclear weapons. A whole city can be destroyed, millions can be killed and there can be long term effects. The world still hasn’t forgot the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War 2, 1945. Even though nuclear weapons have been used only twice until now, the fear of large scale mass destruction still looms as 2000 nuclear tests have been conducted till now. The best solution for this fear is disarmament. A world free of nuclear weapons is what we need to implement for the sake of humanity. However, achieving this goal is not that easy. Disarmament remains only an aspiration despite a…show more content…
The 1950s and early 1960s saw U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower’s Atoms for Peace initiative, the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the development of IAEA safeguards, and the expansion of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. However, two more countries exploded nuclear devices by 1964, and concern heightened that the spread of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes could not be divorced from the proliferation of nuclear weapons. In March of 1963, U.S. President John F. Kennedy described a world where as many as 25 states possessed nuclear weapons as “the greatest possible danger and hazard.” By the early 1960s, efforts to achieve a legally binding agreement to prevent the further spread of nuclear weapons began to show results. In 1961, the United Nations General Assembly approved a Resolution sponsored by Ireland calling on all states to conclude an agreement that would ban the further acquisition and transfer of nuclear weapons. In 1965, the Geneva disarmament conference began consideration of a draft nuclear non-proliferation treaty. The conference completed its negotiations in 1968, and on July 1, 1968, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) was opened for signature. The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, commonly known as the Non-Proliferation Treaty or NPT, is an international treaty whose objective is to prevent…show more content…
In April 1954, almost 10 years after the first nuclear weapon test was conducted in July 1945, Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru of India proposed that nuclear weapon testing be suspended. His proposal was the first initiative of its kind. The Partial Test Ban Treaty of 1963 prohibited all nuclear explosions in the atmosphere, in outer space and under water, but not underground. Negotiations on a Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty began at the Conference on Disarmament at Geneva in January 1994. The final draft, sponsored by 127 States, was submitted to the United Nations General Assembly two years later and adopted on 10 September 1996. The Treaty was opened for signature on 24 September 1996. Under this Treaty each member promises not to carry out any nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosions. They also promise to refrain from causing, encouraging, or in any way participating in the carrying out of any nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear
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