Weetzie Bat Character Analysis

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Although some may classify Weetzie Bat as strictly a tale of reality or fantasy, this novel displays elements that associate with both storylines. Therefore, based on hardships and undesirable events that contrast with circumstances of a fantastical lifestyle, Weetzie Bat categorizes as both a reality and a fantasy. In many aspects of the book, Weetzie Bat depicts a typical reality, defined by challenges that the characters encounter. These complications range from events such as a breakup between a couple to more extreme strains; for instance, the death of a family member. Primarily, an example to reflect a realistic situation is when Weetzie’s father passes away. As the narrator explains, “Charlie was dreaming of a giant poppy like a bed.…show more content…
Duck wrote a note to Weetzie, My Secret Agent Lover Man, Cherokee, Witch Baby, and Dirk, in which he said, “Even though we’re okay, how can anyone love anyone when you could kill them just by loving them? (98). At this point, Duck feels that he cannot love Dirk anymore because that could end up harming Dirk. The news Bam-Bam is sick is truly surprising and upsetting to Duck, and he empathizes for those who are suffering. He cannot seem to get past this, and leaves Fifi’s cottage, deserting Dirk. He does this as a way to relieve distress, because as much as love can seem like a dream come true, it is a “dangerous angel,” (104). This sudden departure indicates a realistic period of time, because when Weetzie Bat was published in 1989, AIDS was becoming more prevalent. The situation of someone suffering from AIDS is dreadful, but also very common worldwide. Therefore, reality is demonstrated here because of the reference to a factual disease and how it affects people detrimentally. These events significantly contribute to the naturalistic features of Weetzie Bat, because their negative results are harmful to the characters and prove how life is not always…show more content…
A perfect life can mean anywhere from a good day to a magical phenomenon. In Weetzie Bat, the ideal lifestyle is made up of unrealistic events that align with those of a fairytale. For example, towards the beginning of the novel, a genie emerges from the golden lamp that Fifi gives to Weetzie. This occurs slightly prior to Fifi’s death, around the time that Weetzie and Dirk have become very close. Weetzie brings the golden thing home, and polishes it off to be shocked yet enchanted to see a genie. The genie says, “I am the genie of the lamp, and I am here to grant you three wishes,” (26-27). At this time, Weetzie cannot comprehend what is before her eyes. Her laughing reaction validates how illusory this incident is, but she plays along with it and makes three wishes. This occurrence reflects on the fanciful component of Weetzie Bat, because the idea of a genie is a myth. This is also proven later in the story, when each one of her wishes come true. Her first wish, which was for Dirk to have his Duck, came true in the next few days. Dirk said, “I met the best one! The perfect Duck. But what is so weird is that this Duck calls himself Duck,” (32). Not only did Dirk find himself a new boyfriend, but this boyfriend is also named Duck. Although Weetzie was not wishing for him to be named this, the genie granted her wish directly as he heard it. Likewise, when Weetzie wishes for her own boyfriend, she says, “My Secret Agent Lover
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