What Are The Female Characters In The Great Gatsby

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Females in The Great Gatsby “They moved with a fast crowd, all of them young and rich and wild…” (77). Taking place in the 1920s, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, features the wealthy upper class who live and spend extravagantly. The story, narrated by Nick Carroway, follows the current life of a man named Jay Gatsby who is the epitome of a wealthy, successful man. His influence molds together characters of the book, as many attend his large, extravagant parties. Although male characters are highlighted, three female characters specifically shape the plot of the novel through their common interests and differing attitudes : Daisy Buchanan, Myrtle Wilson, and Jordan Baker. Daisy and Jordan originate from similar family backgrounds…show more content…
As reflected in this quote, they are both self centered and rather careless about what others are doing around them. Specifically, they are both careless in how they handle and treat their relationships. For example, Jordan carelessly decides to mention that she is engaged to another man when Nick comes to visit her after their breakup, and acts indifferent and unemotional towards the rift between them. “‘You said a bad driver was only safe until she met another bad driver? Well, I met another bad driver didn’t I? I mean it was careless of me to make such a wrong guess. I thought you were rather an honest, straightforward person.” (177). Furthermore, Jordan is extremely hypocritical of Nick, and brushes him lazily aside. Daisy is also careless with her relationships after discovering of Gatsby’s existence nearby; as she bounces between Gatsby and Tom claiming to love both until a conflict is reached and she is forced to choose. “But there was Jordan beside me, who, unlike Daisy, was too wise to ever carry well-forgotten dreams from age to age.” (135). As this quote alludes to, Daisy is smart, but…show more content…
Coincidentally, during the course of this story, both Daisy and Myrtle are physically harmed by Tom. “Then there were bloody towels upon the bathroom floor, and women’s voices scolding, and high over the confusion a long broken wail of pain.”(37). When drunk, Myrtle refused to stop talking about Daisy, and Tom, annoyed by this, punched her in the nose. Similarly, Daisy is also harmed by Tom, although the reason is unexplained. “...the knuckle was black and blue… ‘I know you didn’t mean to. But you did do it…’”(12). The connection between the harm from Tom is significant because it represents the male figure dominance in the society they live in. Although they both cheat on their husbands, their reasoning are different. Daisy wants to hold on to her lover from her youth, Gatsby who she recently meets again after five years. His love for her is so strong it pulls her away from Tom, who is already cheating on her as well. ‘‘You see I think everything 's terrible anyhow’... ‘Everybody thinks so- the most advanced people. And I know. I’ve been everywhere and seen everything and done everything.’”(17). Myrtle is not attractive and regrets her decision to marry Wilson because she finds out that he is really of a lower class. Her affair with Tom is a chance for her to live like she was in the wealthy world and become obsessed with materialistic
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