What Are The Similarities Between There Will Come Soft Rains And Fahrenheit 451

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Ray Bradbury is known for his creative and predictive dystopian literature, which makes the readers think about how unhinged a society can become. In There Will Come Soft Rains, Bradbury gives life to an automated house that cooks, cleans and tends to its owner’s need. The censored story, Usher II, shows how suppressive a government can be towards the creative imagination that books give to the world. While Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 has the same concept, the protagonist eventually turns his back on the government and their censorship towards literature. Ray Bradbury's literature shows how he had foreseen the advancement in technology and censorship in today's society. In Bradbury’s literature, he had envisioned a society with a dependency …show more content…

In Bradbury’s story, Usher II, governmental monitors go around from planet to planet, censoring inhabitants from imagination itself, “You know the law. Strict to the letter. No books, no houses, nothing to be produced which in any way suggests ghosts, vampires, fairies, or any creature of the imagination.’” (Bradbury, “Usher II”, Pg 3). In Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury portrays a society where books are basically forbidden. He constructs a society sheltered from literature altogether, where even so much as owning a book is a crime and punishable by having the books themselves, and possibly even your house, burned, “So now do you see why books are hated and feared? They show the pores in the face of life. The comfortable people want only wax moon faces, poreless, hairless, expressionless” (Bradbury, “Fahrenheit 451”, Pg 39). Modern society today, isn’t extremely censored like Bradbury portrays his dystopian worlds. However, they do indeed still have some sort of unfair to them. “Censorship envy” or the questioning if something is really offensive, occurs a lot nowadays, “One way that speech restrictions often grow is through what I call ‘censorship envy.’ Say one group wins a ban on speech that it finds offensive. It’s human nature for other groups to then ask: What about speech that offends us — harsh criticism of Israel, or of certain religious belief systems, or of abortion, or of …show more content…

Bradbury used many satirical tools in his writing, such as situational irony, dramatic irony and hyperbole, to create the dystopian worlds. In There Will Come Soft Rains, creates a futuristic house with many advanced features. Using hyperbole, he over exaggerates how much the owners had relied on the technological features such as the “small cleaning animals” and the “breakfast stove” which made food for the owners (Bradbury, “There Will Come Soft Rains”, Pg 1). The same concept falls into Bradbury's short story, The Veldt. However, the author exaggerates the children's dependency on their nursery, showing how they rely on such technology for their entertainment: “The two children were in hysterics. They screamed and pranced and threw things. They yelled and sobbed and swore and jumped at the furniture” (Bradbury, “The Veldt”, Pg 8). Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, is the one of the best fitting examples for a dystopian society. The story has a broken, controlling society that is at war, that is also mesmerized by the advancement of their technology: “‘It's really fun. It'll be even more fun when we can afford to have the fourth wall installed. How long you figure before we save up and get the fourth wall torn out and a fourth wall-TV put in? It's only two thousand dollars’” (Bradbury, “Fahrenheit 451”, Pg 9). The dialogue of Millie wanting to actually spend more money on a 4th wall-TV, shows how mesmerized and broken their society is at the

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