What Is Antigone Response To Creon's Edict

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History has shown that religious and personal beliefs frequently clash with societal norms and laws. An example of this is present in Antigone, a Ancient Greek play written by Sophocles in 441 BC. Antigone is a teenage girl(inferred) who was forced to decide whether to give her brother, Polynices, a proper burial or follow Creon’s edict which condemned Polynices’ body to be ravaged by nature. Eventually, Antigone chooses to uphold her beliefs and bury her brother even if it would lead to her death. Antigone’s immense dedication to her morals and her response to Creon’s edict help in understanding her views on moral authority and death. To begin, Antigone believes that Creon’s authority is much less important than that of the Gods. For example, …show more content…

They are alive, not just today or yesterday.” In this dialogue with Creon, Antigone is saying that Creon’s edict does not have the force of divine law. She explains how the gods have been present since the dawn of time and will be present until the end of time. This shows how Antigone values divine law heavily over mortal laws like Creon’s edict. This belief is what leads Antigone to defy Creon’s edict as she believes that it is her duty to uphold divine law rather than the laws of “a mere mortal” like Creon. Furthermore, Antigone proclaims, “These laws —I was not about to break them, not out of fear of some man's wounded pride, and face the retribution of the gods.” Here, Antigone shows that she is more fearful of divine judgment than of Creon’s punishment. This is significant as it shows that Antigone would much rather face death than eternal punishment by the gods. Finally, Antigone demonstrates …show more content…

While her dedication is admirable, it can also be viewed as foolish to some. Her commitment to her beliefs leads her to be extremely stubborn and unwilling to even consider differing opinions. This eventually leads to the downfall of her entire family. While Creon shares the majority of the blame, it is impossible to argue that Antigone had no fault in what occurred to her family and the kingdom of Thebes. This situation is shockingly mirrored in present day society. At least in the United States, the population is so polarized between liberal and conservative ideas that almost no one is willing to make compromises. One can only hope that the people of the U.S. will compromise and acknowledge differing approaches or potentially meet the same, devastating fate that befell the Kingdom of Thebes and the Oedipus

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