What Is Benjamin Franklin's Contribution To The American Revolution

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During the Revolutionary time period, which takes place from 1764 to 1789, the original Thirteen Colonies were under the rule of the unforgiving authority of the British government. But that all changed when the British tightened their imperial authority on the people of the American colonies. The Thirteen Colonies imposed decrees of authority such as the Townshend act of 1767 and the Sugar Act of 1764, which restricted the Americans to resist and not become part of their system, thus indicated an increase in tension between the two countries. Later on, resulting in the glorious American Revolution (“Overview of the American Revolution”). One of the most heroic people of Revolutionary era was, Thomas Paine. Although Paine was viewed as chivalrous…show more content…
Benjamin Franklin reveals himself as agnostic, for when he lived as a child, he gave up on going to church altogether and devised his own ways of worshipping god at home, and he put together his own prayers and continued to pursue his own religious ways. Later on throughout life, Franklin joined the American Philosophical Society, which broadly discussed the subject of religion. Doing thus allowed Franklin to expand his horizons and begin his diplomatic career (Rosteck 115-120). Franklin contributed greatly to the American Revolution, by serving in congressional committees such as the Second Continental Congress ("Benjamin Franklin"). Through so, Franklin heard the unsung hero’s debates during the time, and that’s when Franklin approved of him as the “eventual effect” that Paine would bring on to the American Revolution. Furthermore, Franklin then would aid him to the right path by making suggestions to Paine on the barbaric word of “independence”. Soon afterwards in 1776, Paine publish the pamphlet that would change it all “Common Sense” (Silver). Therefore, Benjamin Franklin is a leading factor up to the cause of Paine’s infidelity and rebellious life lived during the Revolution because Franklin influenced Paine to speak up against odds and to defy what the British attempted to imperialize the Americans, thus brought a whole new world to where he became a writer known as a…show more content…
As a result of publishing this piece, it brought hate to Paine and yet praise to him. The simple fifty page pamphlet attempted to drive many Americans unwilling to break from Great Britain and to rebel and become part of the independence. By doing so, he declared that Britain was overtaking the American’s lives, the English form of government had an unscrupulous King. Despite this happening, George Washington believed that after reading “Common Sense” to the soldiers, they were refreshed and developed the desire to fight the war unconditionally till a winner was brought upon the two sides. George Washington declared that “Common Sense” drove the war into their favor, and thus quoted, “I find Common Sense is working a powerful change in the minds of men” (Bigelow 102- 103). However, some people viewed it as a defector when Paine allegedly declared that King George III as a “Royal brute of Great Britain” (“Common Sense”). Furthermore, Paine also emphasized a powerful attack on the British monarchy, thus demanded a strong federal Union to strengthen the Patriots morale ("Thomas Paine Biography”). Paine emphasized his attack through the use of words, some people might view the Paine as a person who would hide behind his pen and write. However in fact, Paine exemplifies characteristics of that a soldier. In addition, the historian, Albert Marrin asserted that the
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