What Is Chapter 4 The Battle Of Antietam

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Chapter four takes place during the Civil War on September 17, 1862: the Battle of Antietam. The war started over one question: whether or not to ban slavery in the U.S.. General Lee was in charge of the Confederates while General George B. McClellan was the general for the Union during the battle. Lee led his men to Antietam after winning a battle to encounter McClellan’s army again. McClellan’s met him there with 75,000 men, outnumbering them. The battle was violent and horrific, and Gillon states that “more men lost their lives at Antietam than in all the wars the nation fought in the nineteenth century” (pg. 93). The Union won the battle, and marked a change in character of the war. To end the war, President Lincoln passed the Emancipation …show more content…

Andrew Carnegie, a Scottish immigrant, owned a steel mill in Pennsylvania. His business partner, a coke manufacturer named Henry Frick, both were against labor unions. Both tried to stop their workers having unions forever, and Frick told the employees that if they wanted to continue working there, they couldn’t be a part of a union. Frick prepared for a fight by hiring the Pinkertons to end any strikes. Once the workers saw them, however, they started to shoot. The Pinkertons surrendered, but as the workers left the town, they were beaten in the streets.The mill opened up shortly after. One of the sources Gillon used was David Demarest Jr.’s “The River Ran Red”. It tells the story of the Homestead Strike using newspapers, poems, and first-hand accounts of the event. It supports Gillon’s argument by showing the voices of the people involved. Gillon’s point of view is that selfishness destroys democracy. Because of the Homestead strike, most people nowadays work as individuals instead of labor unions. Gillon states that “Any hope of creating a working-class democracy in America died on that bloody July day in Pennsylvania” (pg. …show more content…

McKinley became the 25th President on March 4, 1897, and became “the most popular president since Abraham Lincoln” (pg. 126). On September 6, 1901, he made an arrival at at a reception at the Temple of Music despite his security telling him not to do so. Many citizens greeted him in the temple, one being his assassinator, Leon Czolgosz. When McKinley went in for a handshake, Czolgosz fired two bullets from his revolver into McKinley's stomach. McKinley died of an infection on September 14, 1901. McKinley’s killer’s last words were “I shot the President because I thought it would help the working people and for the sake of the common people.” Theodore Roosevelt became the 26th President after Mckinley passed away, and soon become a beloved President. He destroyed monopolies, and helped preserve the environment in his term. Gillon shows that although the tragedy of the assassination of McKinley was terrible, Roosevelt heard the voices of America changed industries who were hurting the

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