What Is Piaget's Theory Of Cognitive Development

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Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development Jean Piaget was a Swiss psychologist who specifically studied children and how they learn. Piaget began his career by studying zoology but soon became interested in psychoanalysis and cognitive processes. He began his studies on children in 1920 working with Theodore Simon, conducting tests that tested what challenged children at specific ages and what children were unable to do at certain ages. Today, he is widely known for his Theory of Cognitive Development which consists of 4 stages related to age and the intellectual, biological, and emotional development of children. Each stage has an average age range and typical indications of children being in this stage based on his own observational studies.…show more content…
This stage is on average seen in children ages Birth-2yrs old. This stage is when young children are trying to learn gross and fine motor skills. Object permanence is also crucial to this stage in children’s intellectual development. Object permanence is the ability to mentally picture an image even if it is not in front of you. During this stage, children are still exploring and learning their everyday world, and trying to understand the idea that they are different beings from the people and objects around them. Their learning and experiences come from their sensational perspective: taste, touch, and sight. This stage is extremely significant because at this time they learn language and sounds and go through important milestones like learning to crawl, walk and talk. This stage involves rapid and drastic development in every physical and mental…show more content…
This stage is typically seen in children ages 2-7 years old. During this stage, ”the emergence of language is one of the major hallmarks”(Cherry). Children are beginning to use language to describe how they feel and to describe the world around them. At this time, they are very egocentric and struggle to understand the perspective of others. According to Piaget, children know how they feel and it is difficult for them to conceptualize others thoughts or feelings. They also begin to look at things symbolically and use symbols to represent ideas. Instead of just looking at things for what they are like in the previous stage, they can now use symbols to represent something else abstract. Constancy remains as a struggle for children at this stage: for example, if they see 1 mL of water in a wide cup and 1 mL of water in a tall but thinner cup, they will go for the taller because they will not understand it is the same amount of water. Children learn in this stage through: “the use of symbolic language, fantasy play and natural intuition.”. This stage is extremely important in the intellectual development of children and prepares them for more abstract thinking to come soon in their
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