What Is The Blame Game In Frankenstein

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The Blame Game Throughout the gothic novel, Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, blame is often thrown in two directions. Victor, who created the monster for his own superficial reasons in order to become famous and have the gratification for “conquering death”, is blamed by many. On the other hand, the monster could also be the one to blame, as it is his own destructive actions that bring grief and sorrow to many. From my point of view, there is a simple question and answer. Why did the monster feel like he needed to wreak havoc in order to get empathy and understanding for his own isolated feelings? This is all because Victor neglected the once gentle giant, making him feel like a repulsive creature meant for terror. Victor began his work very vigorously and passionately, wanting to reach ultimate fame for his monumental discovery. He went to great lengths to succeed in his experiments, but once he laid eyes on the living, breathing unsightly beast, he could not bare to keep up his work. He neglected him, acting as if the last years working in his lab never happened. He tried to abandon his work completely,…show more content…
He completely abandoned him, leaving the monster in predicaments that, in numerous times, threatened his own life. Everyone in the outside world shunned, beat, and ran away from the poorly constructed monster, automatically assuming he was a malicious demon, ravaging for destruction and death. Not one person who had seen or spoken with him had been nice and accepting, except for one man- who was blind. His unfortunate disposition drew away any type of human compassion for him, eventually filling him with surges of hatred for all of mankind; more so for his creator, Victor. He set his vengeful ways on the scientist's family and loved ones, making sure to fill Victor with the absence of no close comfort or compassion from anyone. If the monster he created couldn't get that, then why should
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