Native American Colonialism

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CHAPTER THREE
RESISTING NARATIVES: CULTURAL RESILIENCE IN
SILKO’S CEREMONY AND BRUCHAC’S CODE TALKER
The Native Americans, the first inhabitants of the Americas, migrated from Siberia by crossing the Beringia, a land bridge which connected Siberia to present day Alaska over 30,000 years ago. Their migration stopped about 11,000 years ago with the submergence of the land bridge by the rising ocean floor. These early inhabitants, named Paleoamericans, settled in the new land they reached and soon branched out into many hundreds of culturally distinct nations and kindreds. The first settlers of the Americas occupied three great regions in North America- the Southwest, Great Plains and the Eastern Woodlands. They were nomadic and at first survived
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The European explorers, settlers and missionaries did not see native beliefs as a religion. Most of the beliefs and traditions of natives were condemned and regarded as pagan by them. These spiritual traditions were the important elements which bound the natives together. It was their strength. Realizing this, Europeans tried to convert them to Christianity, even from the beginning of colonial invasion. By converting them, Europeans hoped to gain their support and obedience towards European colonial rule. With the help of missionaries and by using force large number of natives were converted to Christianity, but majority refused to leave their spiritual traditions and…show more content…
Men were generally responsible for hunting, warfare and interaction with outsiders and had more visible and public roles. On the other hand, women managed the internal operations of the community. They usually engaged in agriculture, food production and gathering of food stuffs and rearing of the children. Women also had many additional tasks that were essential for the survival of the tribes. Historically, they made weapons and tools, took care of the roofs of their homes and often helped men in hunting and fishing. In most of the tribe’s girls were encouraged to ride, hunt and fight. Though fighting in war had mostly been left to the boys and men, in times of need women also indulged in wars. Women were held in high esteem due to their elemental role in supporting village life. Women also played an important role in healing and in taking care of the religious items, a responsibility of the highest order among
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