What Is The Impact On The Outcasts In Of Mice And Men

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In the novel “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck, two men, named George and Lennie, start a new job working on a ranch to save to buy a piece of land to achieve their American Dream during the Great Depression. Lennie is a big man who is mentally challenged who represents innocence, and George is a small man who represents conscience for his actions determine main events throughout the story. George’s enthusiasm for a farm inspires others to work towards his American Dream. Lennie’s innocence that allows him to be a friend to anyone has an impact on the outcasts of society, and his death is such an impact on George that his ‘American Dream’ was obliterated. George has a dream of owning a piece of land and growing crops on it. He convinces …show more content…

Lennie didn’t see Crooks as different from anyone else and didn’t understand that he wasn’t supposed to talk to him. Crooks didn’t have anyone to talk to because of his race, so he was excluded from all of the games and activities by everyone else. This left him completely lonely, and isolated with no one to talk to. He had nothing besides a few books to read alone. Lennie was too mentally challenged to understand anything Crooks told him, but that didn’t bother Crooks because he just wanted to have a conversation with someone that would listen. Seeking for somebody to understand him. He tries to scare off Lennie by explaining what it would be like to have no one. “Crooks said gently, maybe you can see now. You got George. You know he is going to come back. S'pose you couldn’t go into the bunkhouse and play rummy ‘cause you was black.” (Steinbeck 72). On a different note, a female living on a ranch, with no family or friends, Curley’s Wife was lonely and demoralized. The other men on the ranch didn’t talk to her because they didn’t want to start a conflict with Curley. However Curley only thought of her as a trophy and treated her horribly. Curley’s Wife was so discriminated against they didn’t even give her a name. None of the other characters ever thought of her as anything, but something Curley owns. …show more content…

Even though they could still reach it within a few months of work. The dream that was discussed so frequently since the beginning, but it just didn’t feel the same or wasn’t worth as much without Lennie. “George said softly, I think I knowed we’d never do her. He usta like to hear about it so much I got to thinking maybe we would.” When George killed Lennie his hopes and dreams were gone, like the wind. Although Lennie wasn’t mentally able to offer much to their cause besides a paycheck, and petting puppies, he was still a big part of their plan. In reality, the money could be made up by George and friends, but they just gave up. They would’ve lived happily ever after, while George could take care of the rabbits, but without Lennie it wasn’t the same. The death of Lennie and his absence from their plans made such an impact on George, and Candy that their American dream crumbled right in front of their eyes. Although the book ends before you could see the fallout, you can see how George changes. In the beginning he was this short hot-headed man that bossed everyone, but now he's a soft-spoken broken man. A man with no hopes, a fractured dream, and no Lennie to tend the

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