What Is Voltaire's Struggle For Freedom Of Thought?

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François-Marie Arouet, or better known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a genius who in his 84 years “touched human activity at almost every point” (Besterman book p.13). Born in 1694, Voltaire was well known since his teens. His reputations were built through his many literate works, innovative ideas, outspoken social reformations, and governmental controversies, and therefore acquired a vast number of over 1800 friends and acquaintances ranging from peasants to highly ranked individuals. Of course, like many famous people, although with plenty of followers, there is, with every light they shed with their creations, always a darkness shadowing their every move so to bring them down. Voltaire’s scholarly conduct and hunger for freedom led…show more content…
It was an above all religious institute, where his father who was a lawyer wanted him to follow his footsteps. Voltaire was introduced into a free thinking group The Knights of St John of Jerusalem where they met in a temple, which was the last meeting place of the Libertins. In his studious years he “called Bacon, Newton, and John Locke his ‘Holy Trinity’.” (HIST BOOK page 404) Therefore, being influenced by these great minds, after graduating at the age of seventeen he decided to become a writer. Upon hearing this, his dismayed father sent him to work as an assistant to a lawyer because he believed that a profession in literature would be useless towards the society, a burden to his relatives, and would die of hunger. Voltaire was forced to obey his father, however spent the least amount of time working while putting all of his energy towards his writing. When his father found out about his son’s disobedience, he sent Voltaire off to the provinces to study law intensively for two years. There again, Voltaire did not stop writing pieces of literature and poetry. In his last attempt to influence his son’s career choice, he sent Voltaire off to work as a secretary for the French ambassador in Holland, the Netherlands, in hopes of smothering Voltaire’s free thinking literary skills, however it was foolish to do so since the Netherlands was soon overrun by the Frenchmen, who escaped…show more content…
He was a renowned philosopher, who at a young age was exposed to literature and free thinking. His father desperately wanted to change him into a lawyer, but his efforts were in vain. Although Voltaire was continuously exiled, because his exploitations, Voltaire did not once stop his practice. He would write letters to officials to argue cases to release innocent prisoners. He was the voice of reason through his publications in his essays, Candide and many others. Voltaire showed no fear for the government, knowing they were wrong and he right. Even though they kept on exiling him, he would continue his fight for
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