White Privilege In The Workplace

1988 Words8 Pages
Racism is all around the world, and in today’s society, it is modernized and acknowledged as White Privilege. White Privilege is the act of benefiting people identified as caucasian, non-white individuals experience the negative effects of it. White privilege is an unearned asset that the white has access to just based on the color of their skin. White privilege can be displayed in a variety of ways, for example, A white manager having to decide in between a white and black candidate for a higher level position, regardless of the qualification, the white candidate will conquer the job. White privilege discriminates and the Caucasians become so used to the special treatment that they would fault the “others” for not working hard enough to…show more content…
In the African American community, it is instilled at a young age, that we are a different breed and have to work ten times harder for the things we want out of life. Being an African American subjects us to racial profiling and various negative aspects that come along with the territory. The most important aspect of this workplace discrimination is preferential treatment, meaning that a job or employment position is given to someone who is of the right race, ethnicity, or gender. “For African Americans, hard work, experience, intelligence and other factors don’t automatically translate into success. The Black Factor prevents many African Americans from becoming mid-level managers, executives or even entrepreneurs. People pretend there’s no such thing as White privilege and preferential treatment. But, we all know—deep down—that lots of things people receive (from jobs to qualifying for home and business loans) were acquired because they just happened to be the right color or class” (Wills, S.…show more content…
In the article, "Black Nurse In White Space? Rethinking The In/Visibility Of Race Within The Australian Nursing Workplace.”, the author talks about black African migrant nurses moving to a new facility in Australia, and being referred to as the “black nurse”. The nurses experience racism at its finest, it became an everyday thing that it was considered to be normal. In their experiences of being racialised, the black African migrant nurses become aware not only of their black embodiment but of the predetermined racial scripts that black embodiment has in Australia. Whereas in Africa their professional identity was ‘registered nurse’, in Australian workplaces the category ‘black’ becomes racially available because their previously taken-for-granted skin colour, was ‘the norm’ in Africa (Mapedzahama and Kwansah-Aidoo). A participant from the study group stated, “Wherever you go, just by the facials, people looking at you they just think you could be incompetent because you are not born here, you don’t look like anyone who was born here and if you – they realise you were trained overseas they just think, oh well you could be incompetent ... So the people are quick to judge”. The previous remarks are an obvious significance that skin color is a visible difference, that is not completely accepted. The nurses did not only experience racism from the co-workers but also the patients. One of the migrant
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