Why Did Europe Want To Uncolonize Africa In The 1800s

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In the 1800s Africa was an uncolonized country. Europe wanted to imperialize Africa. King Leopold of Belgium was one of the first to colonize parts of Africa for himself. Europe however found out a way to help split up Africa equally, this led to war within Europe. King Leopold was interested in money, not nationalism or culture attitude. The motivation for controlling Africa was to colonize and help the African people. King Leopold of Belgium was interested in the money and wealth that Africa could give him. He decided to colonise parts of Africa. He then enslaved Africans and forced them to dig a mine for him. He however did not listen to European leaders, so they had to proceed and hold the Berlin conference. They decided to divide up Africa in different parts according to how well their country was doing.…show more content…
The Africans felt their race being discriminated. All the countries in Europe wanted to be part of this imperialistic race. Europeans were enthusiastic about controlling Africa and mirroring their own country into African culture. Europeans wanted to completely control the event inside and outside of Africa and their civilization. Nationalism means loyalty and devotion to a specific country. An example of this would be when Africa had loyalty to Europe. This leads to much devotion, but also slavery from Africa. Europe believed they were helping Africa by taking control of everything. While Europe was trying to control and conquer Africa, Africa was really suffering and in hell because of Europe. In conclusion Europe and Africa both suffered from these events. These are nationalism, culture attitude, and economics. In the long run the race for Africa led to a war within Europe. Africa on this day still has European influences in their everyday lives. To this day Africans still strive to survive. Europe strives to be one of the top countries in the world

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