Why Do College Athletes Get Slaves In The System

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Slaves in the System?

Are college athletes Slaves caught in the system or student athletes? College athletes are stuck in the middle. Most college athletes work 60 hours a week, this includes practices and games played. The NCAA will bring in billions of dollars in revenue from the March madness tournament each year, and the collegiate athletes don’t get a penny out of it. Division one College athletes should be paid at least minimum wage, while playing their sport and attending school.

Pursuing this further, most division one athletes have been working at their craft since about grade school or even before. While putting in countless hours to perfect their craft they also have to attend school. If you add up the time spent on practice, training and games, it’s estimated that college athletes often "work" the equivalent of full-time hours for the universities they play for.There are over a million other athletes all with the same goal
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However, some people think college athletes should not be paid for many reasons such as, college athletes already receive numerous benefits. Many get scholarships, which help pay for their tuition, books ,dorms, and sporting equipment. According to the NCAA, college athletes often receive grants worth up to 100,000 dollars. They are the first choice for professional leagues, which draft college athletes at a higher rate than overseas or minor leagues. Also they might argue, college athletes should be considered students first, because by receiving direct payment, they would basically be employees or professionals rather than students. College athletes may forget that their main purpose at school is to learn and study, not to receive money. Finally, if you pay college athletes it would take money away from college budgets that could be used to invest in research, to hire better staff, or to renovate facilities and technology. If colleges are going to invest more money in a program, it should be in academics,
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