Why Is Canada's Vast Multiculturalism

705 Words3 Pages
For many, the question of whether Canada’s vast multiculturalism is beneficial or hindering remains unanswered and unresolved. From its adoption on October 7 1971, multiculturalism was intended to preserve the cultural freedom of all individuals and to provide recognition of the cultural contributions of diverse ethnic groups to Canadian society. Despite multiculturalism being one of Canada’s defining qualities, opinions upon the subject are difficult to form due the unawareness of Canadian citizens and global population. Although the welfare of this outlining characteristic is experienced day by day in the functioning of the country, little to no recognition are given to these advantages. By embracing the variety of cultures within Canada,…show more content…
Over a period of twenty-four years, a sizeable increase of immigrant workers (including that of skilled and educated workers, entrepreneurs, and investors) have been integrated within the provinces of Canada (see Appendix A). As multiculturalism is clearly found throughout modern Canadian government systems and within large businesses of Canada’s economy, the expansion of trades and exports have expanded rapidly. With the obstacle of a language barrier being broken and the preservation of an equal respect to all cultures, statistics showed that a 1% increase in immigration and cultural diversification lead…show more content…
Throughout the past of Canadian growth, there have been several issues pertaining to the acceptance and to the respect of minorities scattered among the nation. This includes the assimilation of Native Americans within schools, work places, and simply within their own living spaces. In 1931, 80 residential schools within Canada were fully functioning and whose soul purpose was to teach the young Aboriginal generations the “correct” manners in conforming to society (such as learning the French and English languages, adopting Christianity, and Canadian customs). If caught using their mother tongue, the students were severely punished. (For more information on residential schools see Appendix B). As the residential educational system remained in place until 1996, the respect for the Aboriginal culture plummeted to an all time low creating a strenuous journey to revive its nature. With the growth of multiculturalism, followed the growth of regard towards Native cultures and their diminishing traditions. Now in today’s Canadian society, “more than 1.4 million people (over 4 per cent of the total population in Canada) identify themselves as an Aboriginal person” (L. Aylsworth, F. Trovato, 2012, para 1) without the fear of assimilation and with the equal respect of every Canadian. Because of the acceptance of multiculturalism, Canadians are able to view one
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