Why Is Nick Carraway Important In The Great Gatsby

1017 Words5 Pages
William Shakespeare, an English poet, playwright, and actor, once said, “Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them” (Shakespeare). In the book The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The narrator, Nick Carraway, a novice in the bond business becomes familiar with the wealthy yet obsolete class of West Egg. Nick meets his enigmatic neighbor, Jay Gatsby, a man of massive wealth that throws extravagant parties every Saturday night. Nick becomes familiar with Gatsby and his past relationship with Daisy Buchannan. Daisy is Nick’s cousin, and the wife of a snobbish unfaithful, polo player named Tom. Gatsby and Daisy repeat the past by developing a relationship behind Tom’s back. During the time of Gatsby and Daisy’s secret relationship, Tom is having a secret relationship with a woman named Myrtle Wilson. When Gatsby is accused of killing Myrtle, Myrtle’s husband George seeks revenge. Nick assigns Gatsby a state of superiority when referring to him as great.…show more content…
When talking about Gatsby and Daisy in the past, Jordan expresses, “Gatsby bought that house so that Daisy would be just across the bay” (Fitzgerald 83). Throughout the novel Gatsby goes through a lifetime of experiences with many individuals but he never forgets about Daisy. Even though Daisy marries someone else when Gatsby went away for the war, he remained loyal and faithful to Daisy. He ended up moving close to Daisy and keeps a longing watchful eye on her house across the bay. Jordan also says, “I think he half expected her to wander into one of his parties some night, but she never did” (Fitzgerald 84). This shows that Gatsby has elaborately planned all these parties just for Daisy. His love for Daisy is so great that he would spend all the money in the world for her. The parties he throws brings out the loving and loyal qualities in
Open Document