Why Is The Handmaid's Tale A Dystopian Society

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In Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Offred narrates her life during both the Republic of Gilead and the United States. In the dystopian society that is Gilead, women are subservient to men. They are placed in roles where many of their rights are stripped of them. Each woman must obey strict laws that pertain to their characters. Offred, the protagonist, is a handmaid. Her specific role is to reproduce for her Commander. While this may seem like a “fantastic” society for the men, where they can own concubines, wives, maids, and property, it is indeed not all it’s made out to be. During the conversation between the Commander and Offred, the Commander reveals why Gilead was founded. He tells Offred, “The problem wasn’t only with the women, he says. The main problem was with the men. There was nothing for them anymore . . . There was nothing to work for, nothing to fight for . . . You know what they were complaining…show more content…
Similarly, school has become such an easy routine that no one works for it anymore. In previous generations, the students worked hard to get what they deserve. There was no internet, no wikipedias, only merit. However nowadays, school has become increasingly easier. Often times I ask myself why I even come to school? Does our education system actually help us learn, or is it mere memorization of facts. I’ve come to this realization where “not-so-hard-working” students can obtain greater rewards than students who are more diligent. Most papers today are not original. With many open sources such as SparkNotes, Wikipedia, and Google, hardly anything that students create requires much effort. Honestly, is what I’m “learning” relevant? All I’m learning is how to do well on tests, how to manage my time, and how to get the most benefits with the least amount of effort. But maybe that’s what school is

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