Why Students Hate School Lunches Analysis

1261 Words6 Pages
Insuring a Lighter America Murphy, Kate. “Why Students Hate School Lunches.” nytimes.com. The New York Times Company, 26 Sept. 2015. Web. 08 May. 2016. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/27/sunday-review/why-students-hate-school-lunches.html?_r=0. Murphy sheds light on the issues illumined in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act enacted by congress which requires strict supervision over the nutritious quality of foods offered in schools nationwide. She compares America’s school eating guidelines to France’s—whose childhood obesity rates rank lowest in the western world. However, she finds that each country;s relationship with food is so fundamentally different from each other and describes how Americas main fault is neglecting to pass down basic…show more content…
The authors analyzed nervous databases to discover that school garden implementation has various benefits that extend beyond just improv-ing the health of its cultivators. The trouble is that the data used to defend this article belonged to too many sources and cannot constitute a bulletproof argument. This article is a good example of how our nation requires more attention on this topic if we hope to make any comprehensive or longitudinal change. When used in tandem, “School Gardens…” and “USDA School Meal Pro-grams…” provide the evidence for such a claim and alludes to the idea that this topic needs more leverage from the…show more content…
explore evident challenges that NSLP presents for food service staff in schools in Indiana. The article helps to express a range of reactions to the new regulations placed by NSLP in 2012. While the rising costs of maintaining fresh food options appears to be a unanimous challenge amongst schools in our nation, the results exhibit a variety of ways to ac-tively combat that challenge. The authors help the audience to think empathically by represent-ing comprehensive concerns from food service workers nationwide adjusting to the new guide-lines. This pathos appeal would strengthen the impact of my argument during the research pa-per. Using direct quotes from active food service employees effectively bring the pathos appeal full circle because it helps the reader to consider perspectives that aren’t their own. So it’s a little sneaky in it’s logic. The audience is forced to consider multiple solutions that could contribute to eating healthier without the fear of resisting current trends. Uncomplicated language and basic tables help to make this article universally applicable to readers who are not a part of the intend-ed
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