Why We Can T Wait Sparknotes

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Martin Luther King, Jr. had extremely powerful words and views in his book Why We Can’t Wait. I was able to learn a lot about the many different nonviolent events that lead to the Civil Rights movement and what occurred after it. Reading King’s book helps readers understand the different struggles African Americans went through. Why We Can’t Wait effectively reflects the struggle of the African Americans from slavery to segregated civility and how they performed their revolution nonviolently. King wrote about the nonviolent movement against racial segregation in the United States, he specifically focused on the 1963 Birmingham campaign. King’s main focus in Why We Can’t Wait is the breakthrough year, 1963, as the beginning of the Negro Revolution,…show more content…
It is a weapon unique in history, which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals. Both a practical and a moral answer to the Negro’s cry for justice, nonviolent direct action proved that it could win victories without losing wars, and so became the triumphant tactic of the Negro Revolution of 1963” (12). I believe that this paragraph is a perfect way to summarize what King discusses in his book. He emphasized the importance of nonviolence and his belief on it. Nonviolence was a successful method of the Negro Revolution that occurred in 1963. King stressed the importance of peacefulness and performing all planned protests in a nonviolent…show more content…
King’s letter is full of powerful and motivating quotes. King explained the topic of freedom and how it was difficult for the African Americans to achieve, he stated: “We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed” (68). The African Americans, specifically the leaders, went through extremely tough and painful experiences. According to King, for the African Americans to achieve freedom they had to fight for it, because the oppressors refused to give freedom to their victims. King knew this because of the many different painful experiences him and the other leaders experienced to receive their
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