Why Women Should Be Banned In The 1920s

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The decade of the 1920s is nicknamed the “Roaring Twenties” for various reasons. With the addition and fads of alcohol, fashion, movies, and more, the 1920s was bursting with excitement; with the new technology and “party” lifestyle, society became more outgoing and extroverted. Even though racism and the absence of women’s rights still existed at this time, the newfound way of life persuaded them to reach for their goals, even though they were both minority groups at this time. The Roaring Twenties are notorious for their colossal alcohol trend and their advanced technology and fashion. Drinking became so enormous that prohibition, a nationwide ban of production, importation and sale of alcohol, had to be created; however, this ban did not stop the citizens. Drinking became an essential component to the people so they started bootlegging alcohol and underground pubs. In addition to…show more content…
Women became more bold and unreserved and spoke out loud for the rights they believed they deserved, while Blacks created a whole new bounty of African American literature, art, and music. In the 1920s, women got to leave the house more often, and it was looked at as normal to not be a house mother all the time. Women realized that there was more out there for them, and that they should be treated like men. The first right they desired was the one to vote. The fight for women’s suffrage officially began at the Seneca Falls Women’s Rights Convention in 1848, and continued for over seventy-two years before it was achieved. Their dispute with the government lead to them gaining more rights including having an ability to vote and work other jobs. Under all the fun and excitement simmered social unrest due to racial hostility, lack of housing, and unemployment. However, the Blacks did receive more opportunities in the arts. This decade promised the African Americans hope, even though there was still so much racial

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